Architecture

The German Pavilion at the Barcelona 1929 / Mies van der Rohe

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion
The German Pavilion at the Barcelona 1929 / Mies van der Rohe it has been modified: 2016-12-19 di Maria Chiara Paccara

For an inexperienced eye, how can it be that of a casual tourist, and already full of the wonders present in the city of Barcelona, ​​the little Mies Pavilion could remain undetected.

Located in one of the most beautiful places in this city, with wide open spaces, green and extensive sports facilities, the neighborhood Montjuic, Being in front of this small, square pavilion may surprise you.

But if you enter the Hall in its true meaning Ludwig Mies van der Rohe built for the Universal Exposition held in the Spanish city in 1929, is the third among the most emblematic works of the code-rationalist style, after the Bauhaus and Villa Savoye.

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

What appears to us in the face is a remake of 1983, since the original was removed the following year.

E 'consists of:

a travertine base which contains high 1,20m in a corner a rectangular pool of water, where you mirror the other parts of the building and thickness to the base where it is as "dug";

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona PavilionMies van der Rohe's Barcelona PavilionMies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

a wall plate with a bench leaning, which holds virtually and connects the coverage plans of the areas covered Pavilion, forming a dividing wall between the interior and exterior of it;

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona PavilionMies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

eight cross-shaped chrome struts hold up the reinforced concrete pavement that covers the actual display area, whose interior is divided with other slabs of masonry or with panels of glass and metal;

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

a second smaller pool of water, from which rises a figurative sculpture of George Kolbe, is placed on the shorter side of the building and is contained in a patio, surrounded on three sides by walls of onyx, which form the outside , no longer a game of slabs but a closed volume;

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

another similar volume, on the opposite side, partially surrounds the big tub, delimits the other short side of the building and fencing with increasingly erratic, the department containing two rooms for offices and services. UNo floor above the second deck area is supported by the wall above and parallel to the pool.

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Its importance has been to introduce significant innovations, such as the "free plan" and "flowing space", but above all as this work is related to its historical linguists and synthesizes many aspects of the modern movement: the avant-garde and tradition. In fact, his description makes us understand how this should work to the code style of neoplastic one hand, for slips, penetrations and splitting volume levels and the classic that we find in the short sides of the pavilion where it is enclosed by walls that create volume and not more breakdowns typical of the poetics of De Stijl, the sculpture by Kolbe and the purism of Le Corbusian matrix, in fact the work is very simple, we are the only decoration in the logic accepted by Loos, one arising from the nature of the material .

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

In summary it can be said that the importance of this work lies in the relationship between perimeter and area, between the geometry and the organic nature of the materials, between Neo and classicism.

Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion

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